Games That Train Drones And Fight Delirium Highlight Presentations On April 24

While many students at The Florida Interactive Entertainment Academy (FIEA), UCF’s graduate video game development program, want to entertain the world by making the next “Red Dead Redemption,” they also are making games that can change the world.

These educational games or “games for good” will be presented at UCF’s Center for Emerging Media on April 24 at 3 p.m.

The projects are part of professor Tom Carbone’s GameLab class, where students learn to develop games for non-entertainment purposes like education, simulation and social causes.  All the students collaborated with a subject matter expert and this will be the first time the students present them to the public.

The games being demoed are “AR Buddy,” “Drone Training,” “Oceana,” “Delirium,” “KoiBito,” “Oasis” and “Psychomotor Skills Research.”

  • “AR Buddy” – Working with researchers from FSU to create a mobile augmented reality app for children recovering from traumatic accident or illness, “AR Buddy” aims to provide a social network to other children and provide additional insights to their health care providers.
  • “Drone Training” – In partnership with a Central Florida simulation company, “Drone Training” helps train drone retail delivery pilots in mission planning and execution.
  • “Oceana” – Working with a UCF music professor and a California-based film production company, “Oceana” is a VR experience that enhances an orchestral score for a short film on our polluted oceans.
  • “Delirium” – Working with the VA and the University of Florida Geriatric Medicine, this “light-weight” VR application simulates symptoms of delirium to help improve clinical staff’s understanding of the affliction.
  • “KoiBito” – Working with a UCF Japanese language professor, the “Koibito” team created a game that trains Japanese language learners in pitch accent detection.
  • “Oasis” – Working with the UCF Toni Jennings Institute, this team developed a VR app to perform high-level screening of executive functions to help prevent more expensive screening.
  • “Psychomotor Skills Research” – Working with FIEA faculty, this research project focuses on the player response times of various demographics and game controller designs.

The presentation is free and open to the public. Faculty, staff and students will be available to comment on any of the projects.

The April 24 presentation will be livestreamed at FIEA’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/ucffiea.

By |2019-04-21T22:35:14+00:00April 21st, 2019|News, Upcoming Events|0 Comments